Month: February 2015

PrEP Users’ Sexually Acquired Hep C Suggests Need for Routine Testing

Evidence of sexual acquisition of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among men who have sex with men (MSM) receiving pre-exposure prophylaxis through a San Francisco clinic has prompted a call for routine monitoring for the virus among PrEP users. In a letter to the editor in Clinical Infectious Diseases, clinicians from Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center describe new cases of hep C among two men out of 485 HIV-negative MSM receiving PrEP at the clinic between February 2011 and December 2014.

Read the full report from AIDSMeds.com.  

Take a Hep C selfie…our blogger did!

Becoming part of this growing movement is simple: take a photo of yourself, forming a C with your hand and share it with your friends on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #selfieHepatiteC. Over 2.5 million #selfieHepatiteC photos have already been posted to help fight stigma and encourage people to get tested. From patients and their families to the general public and celebrities, the movement that started in Brazil now needs your support to become a global campaign!

#selfieHepatiteC

Door-to-door campaign linked hepatitis C patients to care

Working on the streets in medically underserved Philadelphia neighborhoods, members of the Do One Thing program have been able to identify residents chronically infected with hepatitis C and help them overcome the hurdles that prevent people from being cured, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.  Read on….

This post was shared from Caring Ambassadors, Inc.

Pregnant Women With Hep C Have 6% Chance of Passing the Virus to Their Babies

(reposted from AIDSmeds.com)

Pregnant women with hepatitis C virus (HCV) have an estimated 5.8 percent risk of transmitting the virus to their unborn child, a risk that more than doubles if they are coinfected with HIV. Publishing their findings in Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 109 studies to make their estimates about the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT).

The mother’s 5.8 percent chance of transmitting the virus to her baby rises to 10.8 percent if she is HIV-positive. HIV itself raises the risk 2.56-fold, more so than any other determinant of risk.

The scientists stated that more research is needed into other ways that children who are at risk of MTCT may be put at risk for contracting hep C during early childhood.

To read the study, click here.