treatment

CLD offers Board Prep Practice Questions for liver disease care

Board Prep Practice Questions | Clinical Liver Disease

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Clinical Liver Disease (CLD) is an official digital learning resource of The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This interactive, up-to-date source of education is designed for physicians and healthcare providers caring for the patient with liver disease.CLD offers a series of board-style question banks designed to help you determine which articles, videos, audiocasts, and issues are most useful to your practice.

Visit their site to access resources. MORE

Door-to-door campaign linked hepatitis C patients to care

Working on the streets in medically underserved Philadelphia neighborhoods, members of the Do One Thing program have been able to identify residents chronically infected with hepatitis C and help them overcome the hurdles that prevent people from being cured, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.  Read on….

This post was shared from Caring Ambassadors, Inc.

Pregnant Women With Hep C Have 6% Chance of Passing the Virus to Their Babies

(reposted from AIDSmeds.com)

Pregnant women with hepatitis C virus (HCV) have an estimated 5.8 percent risk of transmitting the virus to their unborn child, a risk that more than doubles if they are coinfected with HIV. Publishing their findings in Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 109 studies to make their estimates about the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT).

The mother’s 5.8 percent chance of transmitting the virus to her baby rises to 10.8 percent if she is HIV-positive. HIV itself raises the risk 2.56-fold, more so than any other determinant of risk.

The scientists stated that more research is needed into other ways that children who are at risk of MTCT may be put at risk for contracting hep C during early childhood.

To read the study, click here.

Baby Boomers! Know More Hepatitis!

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have just released the next phase of the national Know More Hepatitis campaign.  Of the estimated 3.2 million Americans who have Hepatitis C, 3 in 4 are people born from 1945 to 1965.  Since as many as 50% of people with Hepatitis C don’t know they are infected, the campaign encourages everyone born from 1945-1965 to get tested for the virus.

The campaign is being implemeneted using a variety of multimedia channels: print, radio, and TV PSAs, as well as airport dioramas, billboards, and transit advertisements.  CDC also developed materials to support educational efforts at the local level, including posters, fact sheets, infographics, and more.

You can view the new Know More Hepatitis PSA on YouTube and an infographic from the campaign below.

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Local television report on Hepatitis C in Mesa County, Colorado

Mesa County is a region in Colorado that is adversely affected by hepatitis C.  Western Colorado AIDS Project reports that, of the many state-funded HCV testing sites, theirs exhibits an extremely high positivity rate for the virus.  While the advent of new and better treatments for hepatitis C has demonstrated cure rates in the 90th percentile, many individuals without health insurance or on Medicaid still don’t qualify based on criteria that looks at history of illicit drug use and disease progression as primary factors.

For the full story and a video report on Mesa County and Western Colorado AIDS Project’s work in the communities there, click here.

Patient Advocate Foundation Launches New Care Line for Hepatitis C Patients

Our friends over at the Patient Advocate Foundation have recently launched a new toll-free care line for people living with hepatitis C.  Case managers on the hotline focus on helping individuals access financial assistance to offset the cost of treatment.

The current reality of hepatitis C is that, while many individuals may be fully aware of their status, a good portion either can’t afford or don’t know how to go about qualifying for treatment.  With the newest hepatitis C medications on the market providing cure rates for certain genotypes in the 95th percentile and above, the need for proactive care and treatment at affordable costs is more important now than ever before.

Individuals living with a chronic infection of hepatitis C can receive case management services via the Patient Advocate Foundation’s Care Line free-of-charge.  The number to call is 1-800-532-5274,  You can also visit their website here.

If you have questions after reading this article, please call our helpline at 1-800-522-HEPC (4372).

Public Radio Report – At The Crossroads, Part 7: Behind Bars, Hep C Takes A Toll

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Rhode Island Public Radio recently hosted a series of informative radio segments on hepatitis C.  We continue sharing this series with Part Seven: Behind Bars, Hep C Takes a Toll on Inmates, and Budgets.  The series covers a range of topics relevant to both patients and providers, including infection statistics, populations at highest risk, the newest pharmaceuticals designed to combat hepatitis C, and barriers for patients attempting to access treatment. Click here to listen to Part Seven of At the Crossroads.

Synopsis:

Rhode Island’s prisons are grappling with a dilemma. Hundreds of inmates have hepatitis C. New drugs can cure it. But they’re so expensive the department of corrections can’t afford them for every inmate who’s sick.

Outside the medium security prison in Cranston.
Outside the medium security prison in Cranston.
Credit Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

In this next part of our series “At the Crossroads,” a look at how prison officials decide who gets treated first.

If you are a person living with hepatitis C and have questions after reading this article or listening to the public radio broadcast, please call our helpline at 1-800-522-HEPC (4372).

Public Radio Report – At The Crossroads, Part 6: Veterans Harder Hit By Hep C

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) chairs the Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs. At a hearing Wednesday, Dec. 3, Sanders wanted to know why new hepatitis C drugs cost so much and how the VA was going to pay for them.

Rhode Island Public Radio recently hosted a series of informative radio segments on hepatitis C.  We continue sharing this series with Part Six: Veterans Harder Hit By Hep C.  The series covers a range of topics relevant to both patients and providers, including infection statistics, populations at highest risk, the newest pharmaceuticals designed to combat hepatitis C, and barriers for patients attempting to access treatment. Click here to listen to Part Six of At the Crossroads.

Synopsis:

In our ongoing series about hepatitis C, we look now at one of the hardest hit populations: veterans. Hep C is three times more prevalent among vets than in the general population. The Veterans Health Administration has the country’s largest hepatitis C screening and treatment program in the country. But that program is struggling to pay for new treatments – and the rising number of veterans who need them.

If you are a person living with hepatitis C and have questions after reading this article or listening to the public radio broadcast, please call our helpline at 1-800-522-HEPC (4372).

Public Radio Report: At The Crossroads, Part 5: The Uncomfortable Math Of Hep C Treatment

Rhode Island Public Radio recently hosted a series of informative radio segments on hepatitis C.  We continue sharing this series with Part Five: The Uncomfortable Math of Hep C Treatment.  The series covers a range of topics relevant to both patients and providers, including infection statistics, populations at highest risk, the newest pharmaceuticals designed to combat hepatitis C, and barriers for patients attempting to access treatment. Click here to listen to Part Five of At the Crossroads.

Synopsis:

What’s the price of a human life? Many of us would say each life is priceless. But health economists sometimes have a number in mind.

Want to know what that number is?

In this part of our series “At the Crossroads: The Rise of Hepatitis C and The Fight To Stop It,” we’ll tell you that – and more. We go beyond the high price of new hepatitis C drugs  to ask: how much is too much? And what the heck is a “quality adjusted life year” anyway?

If you are a person living with hepatitis C and have questions after reading this article or listening to the public radio broadcast, please call our helpline at 1-800-522-HEPC (4372).

Public Radio Report – At The Crossroads, Part 4: New Hep C Drugs Promise a Cure, for a Big Price

Rhode Island Public Radio recently hosted a series of informative radio segments on hepatitis C.  We continue sharing this series with Part Three: New Hep C Drugs Promise a Cure, for a Big Price.  The series covers a range of topics relevant to both patients and providers, including infection statistics, populations at highest risk, the newest pharmaceuticals designed to combat hepatitis C, and barriers for patients attempting to access treatment. Click here to listen to Part Four of At the Crossroads.

Synopsis:

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of the hepatitis C virus. Since then, people with hepatitis C have had limited – and not very effective – options for treatment.

Until now.

Revolutionary new treatments have hit the market in just the last few months. But they’re so expensive health insurers are balking at the price.

Part four of our series “At the Crossroads: The Rise of Hepatitis C and the Fight to Stop it” looks at the high cost of these new treatments and who’s paying for them.